Call Southeastern Data at 1-800-810-0432 for your electornic recycling needs.

Are disposed electronics a major pollutant? How can they be better recycled?

Virtually any, and every electronic device made has some form of toxic material used to make them work. Chemical reactions, non-ferrous and ferrous metals which refer to compounds of metals or metal alloys combined with iron, and other substances that are harmful to the environment will eventually leach out into the area where it is, especially in landfills. Some devices even use precious metals like gold, copper, lead and silver which can be removed and reused.

Are electronics easily disassembled and recycled?

Unfortunately the answer is no. There are so many different types of materials in so many combinations, or mixed with different compounds that to know what, how and where to disassemble them is best left to the expert. A number of these materials can even harm you if you’re not properly protected. Some materials are worth pulling out, like precious metals including gold, copper and others and some are worthless but need to be disposed of properly nonetheless.

Do computer keyboards need to be recycled?

The simple answer is yes.
 

Even though a keyboard looks innocent enough, most consumer electronics contain dangerous materials that can impact the environment in ways that will cause damage to soil, water and/or air. Certain chemicals or metals can leach out of the keyboard and soak into the earth, finding its way into an underground water table, or even be dispersed into the air.When you consider the sheer amounts of electronics, or in this case keyboards that are simply thrown into the garbage and find their way to a landfill, just think of how much of the pollutants will erode out of the equipment over time.

Electronics Recycling: What are the ways to find which e-waste recycling center is certified and reliable?

One of the best and easiest ways to see if the e-waste recycling center you’re considering is to go online and check out all the information available about it. It should show you all of their certifications, and if not, you may want to rethink their services because certification insures you’re getting the best possible service available.A good site should also have testimonials and/or reviews from their past customers and you might even want to take the opportunity to contact a few of them to get more information that may not be on the site due to space, or just to hear more about the services.

Disposing of Your Printer – What to Consider

In our electronic world, new technology with our vast number of gadgets has been a boon, but may also be our destruction. With the amount of devices thrown into landfills, and even our waterways, the earth is being polluted with a large number of chemicals and ferrous metals that can poison the land and water. Computer printers are a large part of this problem because of the materials used to make them print out the superior quality papers also leads to a goodly amount of nasty products leaching out if thrown into landfills. We’re running out of room for waste disposal to begin with, and if electronic devices like printers are included, these landfills will not only fill up, they will be poisoned, creating significant health issues.

Electronics Recycling: How do I get the most money out of my e-waste I’ve been collecting for years?

Some e-waste companies offer what they call a ‘Revenue Sharing’ feature where you can actually get a little cash for all your excess electronic contraptions you’ve been saving up for years. You spent a lot of money over the years on electronic products and with better equipment coming on the market so quickly, it’s not hard to imagine folks with a lot of excess gadgets with a pretty fair original investment value. If you can get a little money back for all of that, why not take advantage of the companies who do offer revenue sharing?

What can I do with my old pager?

As with the many, myriad numbers of electronic devices out in the waste pile, pagers are no different; they need to be recycled. All electronic devices contain some form of hazardous material that would easily leach into the environment if not recycled properly. If it ends up in a landfill, or just thrown away somewhere, it will eventually erode and the hazardous materials will leak out and contaminate the surrounding area.

Why do we recycle electronics?

Basically, we recycle electronics to keep the toxic materials in every device from getting into our environment and damaging the ecosystem. Recycling also provides materials that don’t have to be remanufactured, hence emitting even more pollution while manufacturing new materials from our already dwindling source of raw materials. So recycling actually serves a dual purpose: one, it stops the toxic materials from entering our ecosystem, and two, it reduces the demand for new resources that adds more pollutants while manufacturing them.

States with Electronic Recycling (e-waste) Laws as of 2014

From unwanted cell phones to unwanted computers, old and outdated electronics help create tons of e-waste each year. Often, electronic items are disposed of improperly. Electronics waste has proven to be harmful to both people and the environment.

States are slowly passing electronics recycling laws that require electronic items be disposed of properly. California was the first to pass e-waste laws back in 2003.