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As a way to promote the recycling of cell phones, Vespa and Sprint are partnering on a new program. The program started on June 26th and runs through August 20th, 2011. During that period, a wireless user who returns their unused or old cell phone, regardless of its condition or brand, to Sprint could get a $250 credit towards a new device.

As landfills fill up in South Carolina, penalties for improperly disposing of electronics are being enforced. If anyone is caught dumping electronics, they will get hit with a $1,000 fine. In order to increase awareness and educate the public on the seriousness of e-waste, the Richland Department of Solid Waste and Recycling ran several events that encouraged people to properly recycle any of their old electronics.

Here are some helpful videos and articles that we created to better help consumers and businesses understand the importance of properly recycling electronic devices and business assets.

What is E-Waste and Why Does it Matter? – Focuses on defining e-waste, recognizing the growing problem of e-waste, other forms of e-waste, and why e-waste is different than other forms of waste.

In Clarksburg, West Virginia, the Harrison County Waste Division (HCSWA) conducted their most effective electronics recycling event. On June 4th, the HCSWA collected over 67 tons of e-waste that was destined to be dumped into state-wide landfills. This event set a record in West Virginia for the largest amount of electronics waste collected at one location in one day.

The event provided West Virginia resident the opportunity to properly dispose of e-waste. Residents brought in computer monitors, cables, old televisions, keyboards, unused cell phones, computers, printers and office equipment.

Washington launched their electronics recycling program in early 2009. Since then, over one hundred million pounds of used electronics have been recycled. In just a little over two years, Washington has greatly decreased the amount of electronics waste headed for county landfills. This has not only extended the life span of their landfills, but has kept the environment a whole lot cleaner too.

escrapThe gadgets and electronic devices we use every day have virtually become an extension of us. They even make a smartphone now that users can take with them into the shower. Seriously, who can’t wait 10 minutes to make a call?

Verizon Wireless had quite a line of people to deal with this past week. People were not lining up for their latest product though; they were there to dispose of their old and outdated products.

Verizon Wireless’ Wilmington Call Center hosted a huge recycling rally for anyone within driving distance. People came in droves to drop off computers, monitors, stereos, televisions, and basically anything else that you can plug in.

The production and usage of electronic items and gadgets grows by leaps and bounds each day. What this means is that every time a television, computer, monitor, iPod or cell phone is purchased, the replaced item becomes e-waste.

What is e-waste?

Nearly 3 million tons of old, broken or obsolete electronic items are discarded by Americans every day, some of which contain toxic substances that can find their way into our water and earth; that is e-waste in a nutshell.

A New Jersey warehouse is inundated with 6,000 used copiers, just waiting to be sold. Are you interested? If you are practicing identity theft you may be. Why?

Each and every one of them has a secret; many secrets actually. Digital copiers made after 2002 have a hard drive, just like the one your personal computer has, and it stores a copy of everything you scan, copy or e-mail with the machine.

Old-style TVs and computer monitors contain toxic glass that can end up destroying our landfills if we don’t start finding new uses, according to scientists.

Break open an old TV and check out that funnel-shaped thing. That is a CRT (cathode ray tube) and it is heading out of the mainstream as fast as the floppy disk and video cassette did.